Even if you’re not a traveller, the islands of South East Asia are probably on your bucket list.

The sands are white, the waters are clear, warm and blue, you can dive in the reefs, stay in bungalows, eat local food, lay on the sand, and drink cheap cocktails – anyone who’s been to a Thai island will probably recommend it.

I’m not really sure why, but I thought Combodia’s Koh Rong would be like a Thai island, and it really wasn’t. It was kind of grimy.

If you’re in to drinking all day, everyday, you don’t care what you eat, and you’re not fussed over things like hygiene, you’ll probably love Koh Rong – lots of people do, and that’s great! I think we were there over some sort of holiday, and one of the festive activities involved drunkenly clawing your way up a greased-up metal pole to reach some cash. If that’s what you’re in to, stop reading and buy a ticket immediately! For everyone else, here’s a bunch of reasons to avoid Koh Rong.

Before I begin, I should mention that Koh Rong does look lovely on face value – the waters are clear, the sands are white, and the beach huts are wooden and picturesque and really nice to sit in, but on the other hand, the island is basically inhabited by tourists.

You can’t really walk around and get a taste of local culture or anything like that – almost everything there exists for tourism. It’s all a bit ramshackled (not in an endearing way), accommodation is more expensive than it needs to be, and it feels as though many people are only there to get blind.

All the food joints are run by drunk and/or stoned tourists who (largely) can’t cook. If you want local food, forget it – the menus are full of sandwiches and pizzas, and they’re greasy enough to put you off bread for life. If you come across somewhere selling ‘fresh’ fish, you’ll get something that’s been fried within an inch of its life by one of the aforementioned tourists, and covered in canola oil. 

After a day or so, we noticed the staff at all the hostels and food joints had some kind of infection. They all had a bandaged arm or ankle, and we overheard someone talking about how contagious it was. There was also a human who seemed to have the same skin disease as some of the wild dogs.

By the end of three-days, we couldn’t wait to get off the island.

If you want to travel to the beaches of Cambodia, I recommend Sihanoukville. If you ignore all the drunk tourists and onslaught of Australians screaming “Koh Rong? More like Koh Right!” in the most ocker accents you’ve ever heard in your life, and look at the actual beach, it’s really quite lovely. Plus, the food is great.

Alternatively, if you’re looking for some peace, head to Otres Beach. It’s very close to Sihanoukville, but it’s the complete opposite – calm, serene, and underpopulated. We spent about five days going to each of the 10 or so cafes and restaurants along the beach, and sat there for hours while I worked online and tried to detox from all the beer we’d been drinking.

If you’re looking for actual relaxation, Otres is where it’s at.

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If you like binge drinking, don't care what you eat, and hygiene isn't your thing, book immediately! If not, there are so many reasons to avoid Koh Rong.

Looking for more info on how to get around Cambodia? Check out my travel guide!

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